Trump proposes cutting planned parenthood funds What does that mean

first_img This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. May 18 2018The planned revival of a policy dating to Ronald Reagan’s presidency may finally present a way for President Donald Trump to fulfill his campaign promise to “defund” Planned Parenthood. Or at least to evict it from the federal family planning program, where it provides care to more than 40 percent of that program’s 4 million patients.Congress last year failed to wipe out funding for Planned Parenthood, because the bill faced overwhelming Democratic objections and would not have received the 60 votes needed to pass in the Senate.But the imposition of a slightly retooled version of a regulation, which was upheld by the Supreme Court in 1991 after a five-year fight, could potentially accomplish what Congress could not.The rules now under review, according to Trump administration officials, would require facilities receiving federal family planning funds to be physically separate from those that perform abortion; would eliminate the requirement that women with unintended pregnancies be counseled on their full range of reproductive options; and would ban abortion referrals.All those changes would particularly affect Planned Parenthood.Planned Parenthood, which provides a broad array of reproductive health services to women and men, also provides abortion services using non-federal funds. Cutting off funding has been the top priority for anti-abortion groups, which supported candidate Trump.”A win like this would immediately disentangle taxpayers from the abortion business and energize the grassroots as we head into the critical midterm elections,” Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the anti-abortion Susan B. Anthony List, said in a statement.In a conference call with reporters, Planned Parenthood officials said they would fight the new rules.”We’ve been very clear, Planned Parenthood has an unwavering commitment to ensuring everyone has access to the full range of reproductive health care, and that includes abortion,” said Dawn Laguens, executive vice president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.Here is a guide to what the proposal could do and what it could mean for Planned Parenthood and the family planning program:What Is Title X?The federal family planning program, known as “Title Ten,” is named for its section in the federal Public Health Service Act. It became law in 1970, three years before the Supreme Court legalized abortion in Roe v Wade.The original bill was sponsored by then Rep. George H.W. Bush (R-Texas) and signed into law by President Richard Nixon.The program provides wellness exams and comprehensive contraceptive services, as well as screenings for cancer and sexually transmitted diseases for both women and men.In 2016, the most recent year for which statistics have been published, Title X served 4 million patients at just under 4,000 sites.Title X patients are overwhelmingly young, female and low-income. An estimated 11 percent of Title X patients in 2016 were male; two-thirds of patients were under age 30; and nearly two-thirds had income below the federal poverty line.What Is Planned Parenthood’s Relationship To Title X And Medicaid?Planned Parenthood affiliates account for about 13 percent of total Title X sites but serve an estimated 40 percent of its patients. Only about half of Planned Parenthood affiliates perform abortions, although the organization in its entirety is the nation’s leading abortion provider.Planned Parenthood also gets much more federal funding for services provided to patients on the Medicaid program (although not for abortion) than it does through Title X.Eliminating Medicaid funding for Planned Parenthood has proven more difficult for lawmakers opposed to the organization because the federal Medicaid law includes the right for patients to select their providers. Changing that also would require a 60-vote majority in the Senate. So that particular line of funding is likely not at risk.While opponents of federal funding for Planned Parenthood have said that other safety-net clinics could make up the difference if Planned Parenthood no longer participates in Title X, several studies have suggested that in many remote areas Planned Parenthood is the only provider of family planning services and the only provider that regularly stocks all methods of birth control.Texas, Iowa and Missouri in recent years have stopped offering family planning services through a special Medicaid program to keep from funding Planned Parenthood. Texas is seeking a waiver from the Trump administration so that its program banning abortion providers could still receive federal funding. No decision has been made yet, federal officials said.Related StoriesCommon antibacterial agent may be bad news for bone healthWHO declares the deadly Ebola outbreak in Congo a global health emergencyStudy estimates health care costs of uncontrolled asthma in the U.S. over next 20 yearsWhy Is Planned Parenthood’s Involvement With Title X Controversial?Even though Planned Parenthood cannot use federal funding for abortions, anti-abortion groups claim that federal funding is “fungible” and there is no way to ensure that some of the funding provided for other services does not cross-subsidize abortion services.Planned Parenthood has also been a longtime public target for anti-abortion forces because it is such a visible provider and vocal proponent of legal abortion services.In the early 1980s, the Reagan administration tried to separate the program from its federal funding by requiring parental permission for teens to obtain birth control. That was followed by efforts to eliminate abortion counseling.Starting in 2011, undercover groups accused the organization of ignoring sex traffickers and selling fetal body parts in an effort to get the organization defunded. Planned Parenthood denies the allegations.What Happened The Last Time An Administration Tried To Move Planned Parenthood Out Of Title X?In 1987, the Reagan administration proposed what came to be known as the “gag rule.” Though the administration’s new proposal is not yet public, because the details are still under review by the Office of Management and Budget, the White House released a summary, saying the new rule will be similar although not identical to the Reagan-era proposal.The original gag rule would have forbidden Title X providers from abortion counseling or referring patients for abortions, required physical separation of Title X and abortion-providing facilities and forbidden recipients from using nonfederal funds for lobbying, distributing information or in any way advocating or encouraging abortion. (The Planned Parenthood Federation of America, the umbrella group for local affiliates, has a separate political and advocacy arm, the Planned Parenthood Action Fund.)Those rules were the subject of heated congressional debate through most of the George H.W. Bush administration and were upheld in a 5-4 Supreme Court ruling in 1991, Rust v. Sullivan.Even then, the gag rule did not go into effect because subsequent efforts to relax the rules somewhat to allow doctors (but not other health professionals) to counsel patients on the availability of abortion created another round of legal fights.Eventually the rule was in effect for only about a month before it was again blocked by a U.S. appeals court. President Bill Clinton canceled the rules by executive order on his second day in office, and no other president tried to revive them until now.How Is The Trump Administration’s Proposal Different From Earlier Rules?According to the summary of the new proposal, released Friday, it will require physical separation of family planning and abortion facilities, repeal current counseling requirements, and ban abortion referrals.One of the biggest differences, however, is that the new rules will not explicitly forbid abortion counseling by Title X providers.But Planned Parenthood officials say that allowing counseling while banning referrals is a distinction without a difference.Kashif Syed, a senior policy analyst for the organization said: “Blocking doctors from telling a patient where they can get safe and legal care in this country is the definition of a gag rule.”What Happens Next?All proposed rules are reviewed by the Office of Management and Budget. Sometimes they emerge and are published in a few days; sometimes they are rewritten, and it takes months.Meanwhile, Planned Parenthood officials said they will not know if they will take legal action until they see the final language of the rule. But they say they do plan to use the regulatory process to fight the changes that have been made public so far.KHN’s coverage of women’s health care issues is supported in part by The David and Lucile Packard Foundation. last_img read more

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AbCellera and Denali collaborate to discover new antibodies to fight neurodegenerative diseases

first_imgJun 12 2018AbCellera Biologics Inc. today announced the successful completion of the first phase of its collaboration with Denali Therapeutics Inc. Under the collaboration, AbCellera applied its single-cell screening technology to discover hundreds of novel monoclonal antibodies with specific binding properties against a genetically-validated target for neurodegenerative disease.Denali’s CEO, Ryan Watts, Ph.D., commented, “We are thrilled to collaborate with AbCellera to discover biologics candidates that leverage our proprietary Antibody Transport Vehicle (“ATV”) to cross the blood-brain barrier and that could ultimately benefit patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. We are impressed with the AbCellera team’s expertise and approach.”Related StoriesIgG antibodies play unexpected role in atherosclerosisTreating women with thyroid antibodies with Levothyroxine do not increase live birth ratePremature babies also have protective anti-viral antibodiesAbCellera performs ultra-deep screening of natural immune repertoires from any species to discover antibodies from millions of single cells per run, including plasma cells, B-cells and antibody-secreting cells. AbCellera’s platform supports a wide array of single-cell antibody selection assays, combining multi-step and multiplexed binding measurements, and live-cell assays. The combination of speed, screening depth, and greater specificity generates thousands of high-quality antibodies, and translates to successful discovery against difficult targets such as membrane proteins, GPCRs and ion channels.Beyond its core microfluidic screening technology, AbCellera capabilities integrate expertise in animal immunizations for any species (including humanized rodent platforms), assay design, bioinformatic analysis using a proprietary suite of software and visualization tools, and antibody characterization for developability and engineering. The approach has been validated in multiple partnerships with pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, proving successful when other technologies, including hybridoma, display technologies and emerging B cell selection platforms, have fallen short.”This partnership exemplifies our commitment to work with companies at the forefront of innovation in antibody therapeutics. Neurodegenerative disease is one of the most important frontiers for biologics. It is also one of the most challenging, and bringing new therapies to patients will require the best possible technologies on every front,” commented Carl Hansen, CEO of AbCellera. “The speed and success of this project highlight what can be achieved when companies work closely together and share complementary technologies. It has been an absolute pleasure working with the Denali team and we are excited to be providing innovation that enables their most demanding discovery programs.”Financial terms of the collaboration were not disclosed. Source:https://www.abcellera.com/news/2018-06-abcellera-announces-collaboration-with-denali-therapeuticslast_img read more

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Scientists obtain key information about proteins from single human cells

first_imgJun 19 2018Scientists have obtained a slew of key information about proteins, the molecular workhorses of all cells, from single human cells for the first time.The stockpile of information about proteins – the most such data ever collected from a single mammalian cell – gives scientists one of their clearest looks yet at the molecular happenings inside a human cell. Such data can reveal whether a cell is a rogue cancer cell, a malfunctioning pancreatic cell involved in diabetes, or a molecular player important for a preemie’s survival.These events and many more are determined by the actions of proteins in cells. Until now, detailed information on proteins inside single cells was hard to come by. The raw “data” – the amount of each protein – in a cell is extraordinarily scant and hard to measure. That’s largely because scientists can’t amplify proteins the way they can genes or other molecular messengers.Now, in a study published in Angewandte Chemie, scientists from the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, working with counterparts at the University of Rochester Medical Center, show how they were able to learn an unprecedented amount of information about the proteins within samples of single human lung cells.The scientists analyzed single cells, first from cultured cells and then from the lungs of a human donor, and detected on average more than 650 proteins in each cell – many times more than conventional techniques capture from single cells.The team, including analytical chemists Ying Zhu and Ryan Kelly and biochemists Geremy Clair and Charles Ansong, made the findings thanks to a technology created at EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a DOE Office of Science user facility located at PNNL. The team developed the technology, called nanoPOTS, to measure proteins in a tiny, almost unimaginable amount of material.”NanoPOTS is like a molecular microscope that allows us to analyze samples that are 500 times smaller than we could see before,” said Kelly, the corresponding author of the paper. “We can identify more proteins in one cell than could previously be identified from a group of hundreds of cells.”That’s important for a couple of reasons. Some proteins exert immense influence within a cell, perhaps determining whether the cell will live, die, mutate or travel to another part of the body, even when they are at very low levels that are undetectable using today’s methods.In addition, conventional technologies typically analyze hundreds or thousands of cells, pooling them into one batch for analysis. Those findings represent an average view of what’s happening in that tissue; there is little insight to what’s actually happening in a specific cell. That’s a problem if there’s variability from cell to cell – if some cells are behaving normally while other cells are cancerous, for instance.Related StoriesQuorn protein stimulates muscle building to a greater extent than milk proteinMother calls for protein shake regulation after daughter diesUsing NMR to Study Protein Structure, Dynamics and MechanismsIn the current study, the team analyzed the proteins in a sample of fluid that is less than one-ten-thousandth of a teaspoon. Within that sample, the proteins amounted to just .15 nanograms – more than ten million times smaller than the weight of a typical mosquito.Once scientists have their hands on such a valuable commodity – the innards of a single human cell – they put it through a battery of processing steps to prepare for analysis. But working with such a tiny sample has posed significant roadblocks to single-cell analysis. As the material is transferred from one test tube to another, from machine to machine, some of the sample is lost at every stage. When the original sample amounts to no more than a microscopic droplet, losing even a tiny bit of the sample is catastrophic.Zhu and Kelly developed nanoPOTS, which stands for nanodroplet Processing in One pot for Trace Samples, to address this problem of sample loss. The technology is an automated platform for capturing, shunting, testing and measuring tiny amounts of fluid. Keys to the technology include a robot that dispenses the fluid to a location with an accuracy of one millionth of a meter, moving between tiny wells that minimize the amount of surface area onto which proteins might glom.Within those tiny wells, scientists run several steps to isolate the proteins from the rest of the sample. Then, the material is fed into a mass spectrometer which separates out and measures each of hundreds of proteins.All told, the technology reduces sample losses by more than 99 percent compared to other technologies, giving scientists enough of the scant material to make meaningful measurements – to tell which proteins are at high levels and which are at low levels. That’s vital information when comparing, for example, brain cells from a person with Alzheimer’s disease to those from a person not affected, or looking at cells that are cancerous compared to nearby cells that are healthy.PNNL scientists have used NanoPOTS to get a closer look at the proteins involved in the development of type 1 diabetes in the pancreas. The group is currently developing a protein map of cancerous tumors, with funding from the National Cancer Institute under the Beau Biden Cancer Moonshot Initiative.Source: https://www.pnnl.gov/last_img read more

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Humans spread through South America like an invasive species

first_imgIt took humans a long time to reach South America. But once they got there, they spread like weeds—literally. In a new study, researchers tallied up 1147 archaeological sites that had been radiocarbon-dated to between 14,000 years ago (right around the earliest known settlements in South America) and 2000 years ago. By mapping those sites, the scientists can see where people lived and when. The density of settlements increased rapidly and steadily from 13,000 to 9000 years ago, as humans spread to every corner of the unoccupied continent and learned to take advantage of its resources. (Way better than the 6000 years their ancestors spent stranded in the Beringian tundra.) But about 9000 years ago, South American population growth appears to level off, the researchers report online today in Nature. That’s a pattern followed by many an invasive species that finds itself in a new, hospitable habitat: It spreads quickly but then maxes out its resources and levels off. Eventually, however, people in South America found a way around this natural limit. About 5000 years ago, human populations started expanding once again, at this time, they grew even more rapidly. So what changed? People all over South America transitioned from hunting and gathering to farming. Agriculture and sedentary lifestyles gave them more time and resources, making it easier to have lots of babies.last_img read more

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Stifling accounting rules threaten jobs and science at Spanish institutes

first_img Researchers have trouble recruiting staff or buying equipment even if they receive funding from outside Spain, says Manuel Ruiz Villarreal, a physicist at IEO’s A Coruña branch and the principal investigator of four projects funded by the European Union, including an effort to predict the health risks of toxic algal blooms. Ruiz Villarreal says the auditing system, known as “prior intervention,” should be lifted for projects that receive external funding and are already subject to checks after the money is spent.Other OPIs must adhere to similar rules, but the manifesto says the situation is worst at IEO, which signatories say reveals a “structural problem” in the institute’s management. “We’ve been raising the alarm for several years,” Ruiz Villarreal says. “As a researcher, I can’t go to the minister of the treasury myself. Our management has to tackle this.””It’s true we are having difficulties,” admits IEO Director Eduardo Balguerías Guerra, who says the institute needs time to adapt to the rules but denies that its activities are paralyzed. “All the OPIs and the secretary of state are working very hard to solve these problems,” he says. Until Spain’s 2018 budgets are approved, additional restrictions will continue to exacerbate the difficulties, Balguerías Guerra says. But after that, he thinks the situation will improve.Carmen Vela, state secretary in charge of research, development, and innovation, has admitted that IEO had “problems in its day-to-day management” and “had a bad [budget] execution.” Vela told members of the Spanish congress’s economy, industry, and competitiveness committee on 14 March that the institute’s low spending was due to a large building project that did not get approval last year. She also conceded that the “prior intervention” system has created difficulties for the OPIs and said she is taking steps to minimize damage. But some observers say a patchwork of emergency measures won’t provide a lasting solution.PSA, the solar energy center, is part of an OPI called the Center for Energy, Environment, and Technology, which has also suffered from a 2016 regulation stipulating that funds received before September must be spent before the end of that same year. PSA scientists say this rule makes no sense when a grant is meant to be spread across several years, as many EU grants are. In the first 6 weeks of this year, PSA lost 14 research jobs out of a total of 40 because funds received earlier were blocked and the center couldn’t advertise the posts, says Sixto Malato, a scientist in PSA’s research unit for the solar treatment of water. He stepped down from his role as PSA director last November to protest the rules.A total of €6 million, the entirety of PSA’s research budget, is blocked and will have to be gradually returned to the European Commission with interest if the rules are not reversed, Malato says. “The government has to recognize their mistake,” he says. “We’re not asking for funds, we’re asking [the treasury] to let us use external funds that will be spent in Spain and create jobs in Spain.” Stifling accounting rules threaten jobs and science at Spanish institutes Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country geogphotos/Alamy Stock Photo Email Stifling government accounting rules are threatening scientific projects and jobs at several Spanish research bodies. Scientists at both the Spanish Oceanography Institute (IEO), headquartered in Madrid, and the Solar Platform of Almería (PSA), a large solar research center in the Tabernas Desert, have expressed concern about what they see as senseless red tape that holds up spending.Some 340 staff at IEO—60% of the total—sent a manifesto to the press last week to warn that the center is “collapsing.” The problems compound the plight of Spanish science, which suffered from budget cuts during the country’s recent economic woes and faces a proliferating bureaucracy aimed at controlling spending.IEO’s troubles stem partly from rules that apply to five public research bodies, known as OPIs in Spanish, with a total of 1700 researchers. Under accounting regulations introduced by the current conservative government in 2014, a team of six state auditors must preapprove every purchase at IEO, which has nine research centers across the country and five research ships. As a result, projects and recruitment have been severely delayed and IEO spent only half of its budget last year, down from 90% in 2013, according to the manifesto.center_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Research jobs were lost at the Solar Platform of Almería in Spain because stifling new accounting rules blocked funds. 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Hundreds of new genes may underlie intelligence—but also autism and depression

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Many genes work together in the brain to cause complex behavior such as intelligence or anxiety. Hundreds of new genes may underlie intelligence—but also autism and depression By Ann GibbonsJun. 25, 2018 , 11:10 AM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Being smart is a double-edged sword. Intelligent people appear to live longer, but many of the genes behind brilliance can also lead to autism, anxiety, and depression, according to two new massive genetic studies. The work also is one of the first to identify the specific cell types and genetic pathways tied to intelligence and mental health, potentially paving the way for new ways to improve education, or therapies to treat neurotic behavior.The studies provide some of the first “hard evidence of the many genes and pathways” that work together in complex ways to build smart brains and keep them in balance, says geneticist Peter Visscher of the Queensland Brain Institute at The University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, who was not involved in the work.Researchers have long known that people often inherit intelligence and some personality disorders from their parents. (Environmental factors such as education and stress also profoundly shape intelligence and mental health.) But geneticists have had trouble identifying more than a handful of genes associated with intelligence. Last year, researchers used new statistical methods that can detect strong associations between genes and specific traits to analyze health and genetic records in huge data sets. This led to the discovery of 52 genes linked to intelligence in 80,000 people.center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Helen Tolokonova/Alamy Stock Photo Now, the same team has added almost 1000 genes to that list. Researchers led by geneticist Danielle Posthuma of Vrije University in Amsterdam scoured 14 databases of health and genetic records to identify 939 new genes associated with intelligence in 250,000 individuals. (The data sets measured intelligence with scores on tests of abilities such as mathematics, synonyms, and logic.) Many variants of genes associated with higher intelligence turned up in people who also lived longer and did not have Alzheimer’s disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, or schizophrenia, the team reports today in Nature Genetics, suggesting that intelligence protects against these disorders. On the downside, genes associated with intelligence correlated with a higher risk for autism.In a separate study also published today in Nature Genetics, Posthuma and her colleagues identified 500 genes associated with neurotic traits, such as anxiety and depression, by searching the health and genetic records of 449,400 individuals in large databases, such as the UK Biobank, a repository of information on the genetics, health and wellbeing of 500,000 British volunteers, and 23andMe, a personal genomics company in Mountain View, California, with genetic and health data on 5 million customers. They also found that people who worried a lot had inherited different genes than those who were more likely to be depressed, suggesting that there are different underlying genetic pathways for those conditions.In both studies, the researchers used a new statistical method called MAGMA to quickly search genetic data to identify specific types of cells and tissues where the genes were expressed. Many genes for intelligence were expressed in the “medium spiny neurons” which are part of the basal ganglia, clusters of neurons deep in the brain involved in learning, cognition, and emotion. The researchers also identified many potential targets for developing new pharmaceutical drugs.“If you can understand the mechanisms at the cell level, you can also look at candidates for medication,” Posthuma says. The same is true for genes for intelligence, she says, which could offer clues to new ways to protect against Alzheimer’s and other disorders.last_img read more

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This animal image may be the worlds oldest figurative art

first_img By John PickrellNov. 7, 2018 , 1:00 PM This large cave wall in Borneo features several paintings of wild cattle; the indistinct image at top center has been dated to at least 40,000 years old.  This animal image may be the world’s oldest figurative art Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Luc-Henri Fage Emailcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Daubed in orange ochre at least 40,000 years ago, images of what appear to be wild cattle on the Indonesian island of Borneo are now the oldest known figurative paintings in the world. Painted in a remote limestone cavern, they are more than 4000 years older than the previous record holders on nearby Sulawesi, and they add to evidence that thriving artistic traditions were emerging simultaneously in Europe and Asia.Until recently, most researchers thought the home of the earliest figurative paintings—those depicting people and animals rather than abstract objects—was France’s Chauvet Cave. Vivid images of prehistoric rhinos, cave lions, and horses there have been dated to about 35,000 years old. But in 2014, a team led by geochemist and archaeologist Maxime Aubert of Griffith University in Gold Coast, Australia, dated paintings of wild pigs in caves on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi to at least 35,400 years old. Stencils of human hands there were at least 40,000 years old.Now, as they report today in Nature, Aubert’s joint Indonesian-Australia team has dated a painting of what may be a banteng, a Southeast Asian wild cattle, in Borneo’s Lubang Jeriji Saléh cave, to at least 40,000 years ago; hand stencils there may be up to 52,000 years old, making them among the oldest such prints in the world. “This is a remarkably important finding,” says Sue O’Connor, an archaeologist at Australian National University in Canberra who focuses on Southeast Asia and Australia, but was not involved in the new study. “It shows that the [previously discovered] Sulawesi rock art … was not regionally unique, but rather is part of a larger artistic and symbolic tradition” tracking some of the earliest modern humans in Southeast Asia, she says.Rock art adorns many caves in the mountainous province of East Kalimantan. The researchers found that the paintings in Lubang Jeriji Saléh cave are of three styles and ages: the ancient orange animals and hand stencils; purplish hand stencils, intricate motifs, and dynamic human figures dated to 20,000 to 21,000 years ago; and black charcoal designs thought to have been left by Neolithic farmers about 4000 years ago. Over the millennia “there was clearly a shift from depicting the animal world to depicting the human world,” Aubert says—a trend also seen in the cave art of Europe.To date the paintings, Aubert’s team turned to a now widely used technique, measuring the ratios of uranium and thorium in the calcite crusts that had accumulated on top of the cave paintings. The scientists took 65 different samples and tested for contamination that could have come from sources other than the calcite. They showed that the calcite layers were youngest at the surface and oldest closer to the paintings, meaning the dating is sound, Aubert says.Jane Balme, an archaeologist at the University of Western Australia in Perth, says the discovery “draws attention to the widespread similarities in human’s symbolic expression across the globe.” We now know that the famous cave art of Europe “is just one area where such expression occurred 40,000 years ago,” she says.But precisely how the various styles of art are linked to waves of migration is still an open question. “The discovery of three different chronological styles is quite amazing, as we can follow the evolution and changes of rock art over 50,000 years,” says Francois-Xavier Ricaut, a biological anthropologist from the University of Toulouse in France, who has also been working on Borneo. He says the big question now is whether the two older types of art represent the arrival of different peoples or were created by one population whose style evolved over time.Aubert suspects humans in the region—present as far back as 60,000 to 70,000 years ago—didn’t create art until populations reached a critical mass. That wouldn’t have been true of the region’s earliest inhabitants, of whom no art has been discovered.His team plans to look for butchered animal bones, tools, and other traces of the ancient artisans in the caves, starting next year. “We want to find out who made those paintings,” he says.last_img read more

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New climate stripes reveal how much hotter your hometown has gotten in

first_img Email By Eli KintischJun. 26, 2019 , 3:00 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe New climate ‘stripes’ reveal how much hotter your hometown has gotten in the past century Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) ShowYourStripes A social media campaign called #ShowYourStripes is flooding the climate science community with beautiful blue and red striped barcodelike images, each of which represents more than a century of temperature data for virtually all countries and all 50 U.S. states. (The stripes visualizing global warming since 1850 are above.)Inspired to create visually elegant and shareable climate data, climate scientist Ed Hawkins at the University of Reading in the United Kingdom created the “warming stripes,” which use bands of color to indicate warming or cooling temperatures from 1901 to 2018, last year. Just last week, Hawkins unveiled showyourstripes.info, allowing anyone to download and post their region’s stripy climate data.The site has logged more than 1 million downloads, from more than 180 countries. Offline, the stripes have decorated ties, cufflinks, a Tesla in Minnesota, and a German music festival’s stage. Through a campaign led by nonprofit ClimateCentral, more than 100 TV meteorologists in the United States and abroad have featured the stripes, which have been retweeted thousands of times. The campaign hasn’t been without its detractors, however. Some have worried that warming stripes of individual countries or states, taken out of context, could advance the idea that global temperatures aren’t rising. Others say the charts should include axes or a legend. But J. Marshall Shepherd, former president of the American Meteorological Society in Boston, has commended Hawkins for his “innovative” approach and “outstanding science communication” effort.last_img read more

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Who sniffs the sniffers Electronic nose takes a whiff of dogs to

first_img By Elizabeth PennisiFeb. 21, 2019 , 2:35 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The eNose picked up leishmaniasis infections 95% of the time, the team reported last week in a preprint on bioRxiv. Further tests and a sturdier, more customized eNose are needed though before eNose takes to the streets as a tool for curbing the number of infected dogs and reducing infections in people, the researchers note. But if it can work on dogs, it can also work to quickly detect infections in humans, they predict. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Monica Staniek Dogs are champs at smelling, a quality that has been harnessed to sniff out mines and may one day be used to diagnose cancer. But now it’s an electronic nose’s turn to sniff the pooches.The reason: “visceral leishmaniasis,” a disease spread by the sand fly parasite that can cause weight loss, enlarged organs, and fever in people and weight loss, diarrhea, and skin problems in dogs. The number of human cases has doubled in Brazil since 1990, causing several thousand deaths a year.Now, public health officials use a time-consuming, two-part test to identify infected dogs as part of their effort to reduce parasite populations. To see whether an “eNose” would work better, researchers collected blood and hair samples (pictured) from 16 dogs known to carry the parasite and 185 other dogs. Hair from infected dogs smells different from the hair of uninfected dogs. The handheld device contains sensors that send different electrical signals depending on the chemical compositions of odors. Water-filled bags of hair were heated and then samples of the air in the bag were blown across the eNose. Who sniffs the sniffers? Electronic nose takes a whiff of dogs to spot deadly diseaselast_img read more

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Legendary Rapper Bushwick Bill Dies At 52

first_imgUPDATED: 6:18 a.m. EDT, June 10 —Legendary Houston rapper Bushwick Bill, a founding member of the iconic Geto Boys, died Sunday night at the age of 52 after a brief fight with cancer. The diminutive hip-hop luminary from the genre’s golden age announced last month that he had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.Rolling Stone confirmed the death late Sunday night after a day of confusing reports over whether Bushwick Bill had actually died.“Bushwick Bill passed away peacefully this evening at 9:35 p.m. He was surrounded by his immediate family,” his publicist, Dawn P., told Rolling Stone. “There were incorrect previous reports that he had passed away this morning. We are looking into doing a public memorial at a later date. His family appreciates all of the prayers and support and are asking for privacy at this time.” Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist Bushwick Bill reportedly leaves behind four children.Pancreatic cancer has long targeted Black people, but even more vexing was the fact that so little is known about it, including what causes it. The statistics for pancreatic cancer victims along racial lines are damning, with a lopsided number of Black people being diagnosed with the ailment. Scientists haven’t determined what causes pancreatic cancer, and treatment options are limited, according to the American Cancer Society. However, there were several risk factors that physicians have concluded were linked to pancreatic cancer, including tobacco use and being overweight or obese.However, cancer has been proven to be more deadly for Black people, with that fact being resoundingly true for pancreatic cancer patients, statistics have shown since around 1970, when pancreatic cancer trends began reversing themselves along racial lines.“In white men, pancreatic cancer death rates decreased by 0.7% per year from 1970 to 1995 and then increased by 0.4% per year through 2009,” according to research published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. “In contrast, the rates among blacks increased between 1970 and the late 1980s (women) or early 1990s (men).”The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine took it a step further and found through clinical research that the “incidence of pancreatic cancer is 50 – 90% higher in African Americans than in any other racial group in the United States. Not only is pancreatic cancer more common among African Americans, but African Americans also have the poorest prognosis of any racial group because they often are diagnosed with advanced, and therefore, inoperable cancer.” Aretha Franklin and Kim Porter SEE ALSO:NFL Players Just Gave Trump Some Food For Thought On Sentencing ReformPittsburgh Teen Killed By Police Once Wrote He Hoped His Mother Wouldn’t ‘Feel That Pain’ Of Burying Him More By NewsOne Staff In Memoriam: Notable Deaths In 2018center_img The Geto Boys is most known for the hip-hop classic song, “Mind Playing Tricks on Me.” See the classic video below: A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ That announcement came hours after fellow Geto Boys founder Scarface’s Instagram post Sunday morning saying “RIP Bushwick Bill” seemed to imply that he had died.That turned out to not be the case, Dawn P. told the Associated Press Sunday afternoon, saying that the rapper was on a ventilator at a Colorado hospital at the time.Scarface’s post was consequently deleted as other reports quickly came out saying Bushwick Bill had not yet died. It was unclear what exactly led Scarface to post that tragic announcement.Bushwick Bill, whose real name is Richard Stephen Shaw and was born with dwarfism, told TMZ in early May that doctors said, “‘We see a mass on your pancreas and we can’t understand because it’s not alcohol, it’s not sugar, it’s not diabetes — they went through all kind of stuff. Finally, by February they said it was stage four pancreatic cancer.”He continued, “And I’m like, ‘Stage 4? I’ve been getting tested and they said it was just a mass but it was benign. And I’m like, ‘Does benign mean it could be cancer?’ And they were like, ‘It’s just a mass with no purpose.’ So it was crazy to find out that pancreatic cancer is undetected until it’s in the fourth or fifth state.”He said he didn’t fear death, “It’s not like I’m afraid of dying. I know what it’s like on the other side. That’s not what it’s really about. It’s about life and loving life. I just want people to be aware so that when they set dreams or goals, they’re healthy enough to fulfill and live.” Bushwick Bill , Cancer , Hip Hop Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Familylast_img read more

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Viking cat skeletons reveal a surprising growth in the size of felines

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe J. Bitz-Thorsen et al., Danish Journal of Archaeology 7, 241 (2018)/© World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry Viking cat skeletons reveal a surprising growth in the size of felines over time Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Many animals shrink when they become domesticated—the average dog is about 25% smaller than its wild cousin the gray wolf, for example—but a curious thing appears to have happened to cats during the Viking era: They got bigger. More research is needed to confirm the new finding, but there’s a good chance it had to do with being better fed.“Such a shift has never been documented elsewhere, as far as I know,” says archaeozoologist Wim Van Neer of the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in Brussels, who was not involved in the study.When Julie Bitz-Thorsen was an undergraduate at the University of Copenhagen, her adviser, archaeozoologist Anne Birgitte Gotfredsen, gave her an unusual task: Sift through dozens of bags of material from archaeological sites all over Denmark, and carefully pick out all the cat bones. Gotfredsen wanted to find out how much Iron Age, Viking, and medieval cats differed from modern house cats. By Emily UnderwoodDec. 12, 2018 , 2:55 PMcenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Astrid Gast/shutterstock.com Skull bones from ancient and modern Danish house cats show how cats have grown over 2000 years (Viking cat skulls in upper right corner, modern cats lower right corner). All domesticated cats are descendants of the Near Eastern wildcat (Felis silvestris lybica), a diminutive, tawny feline that still stalks Middle Eastern deserts. Although the oldest evidence of domesticated cats comes from a 7500-B.C.E. grave in Cyprus—early Egyptians likely did the slow, patient work of cultivating house cats’ lovable personalities. As early as 1700 B.C.E., cats started to sail across the Mediterranean, carried aboard ships as gifts and to eradicate pests.By 200 C.E., the people of Iron Age Denmark were keeping cats. Among charred human bones in a cremation grave from that period, researchers discovered a cat ankle bone with a drill hole, suggesting it was worn as an amulet. The Vikings—who were farmers as well as seafaring marauders—apparently raised cats for their warm fur and to control pests. By 850–1050 C.E., cat pelts started to bring a high price in Denmark.In the new study, Bitz-Thorsen painstakingly removed hundreds of cat skulls, femurs, tibias, and other bones from bags of mixed dog, horse, and cow bones stored at the Zoological Museum in Copenhagen. The remains encompassed more than 2000 years, beginning in the late Bronze Age and ending in the 1600s. Many came from pits where Vikings disposed of cat carcasses after removing their fur. From the marks on the bones, “You can tell the cats were skinned—they have cut marks, or the neck has been broken,” Bitz-Thorsen says. Cat bones are less common than the remains of other domesticated animals in most archaeological sites, so the new cache of bones is scientifically valuable, Van Neer says. “I do not know of any other series of cat bones that cover such a long period, with so many individuals.”After carefully measuring the bones with an electronic caliper, Bitz-Thorsen and Gotfredsen compared them with those of modern Danish cats dating from 1870 to the present.On average, domesticated cats grew by about 16% between the Viking Age and today, they report this month in the Danish Journal of Archaeology.The study only focused on Danish cats, so the findings may not be generalizable to other parts of the world. However, a 1987 study of a collection of cat bones from Germany bolsters the idea that domestic cats of the medieval age were smaller than modern-day pets.One reason may be more access to food. During the medieval period, mounting waste from expanding towns attracted more pests and provided cats with better nourishment, boosting their numbers and potentially their size. Between the late Middle Ages and today, cats became treasured and well-fed, reducing the energy they expend on finding food, Bitz-Thorsen says.  But it’s not clear whether cats got bigger simply because they were eating more or whether something changed in their genes to make them larger, says University of Oslo postdoc Claudio Ottoni, who studies cat domestication. To answer this question, scientists will need to analyze DNA in ancient cat bones, he says, and look for chemical signatures of a changing diet.last_img read more

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Dominica celebrates World Blood Donor Day 2019

first_imgShareTweetSharePinDominica joins the rest the world today in celebrating World Blood Donor Day. This event serves to thank voluntary blood donors for the lifesaving gift of blood. It also raises awareness of the need for regular blood donations to ensure that all individuals and communities have access to a safe and timely supply of blood.This year’s theme is “Safe Blood for All”Blood is an important resource, both for planned treatments and urgent interventions. It can help patients suffering from life-threatening conditions live longer and with a higher quality of life, and supports complex medical and surgical procedures. Blood is also vital for treating the wounded during emergencies of all kinds (natural disasters, accidents etc.) and has an essential, life-saving role in maternal and perinatal care. A blood service that gives patients access to safe blood in sufficient quantity is a key component of an effective health systemBlood Donation at the PMHOn average 1,200 donors per year give blood.More men have given blood than women.35-55 years is the age group most likely to have given bloodIn observance of World Blood donor day, the Princess Margaret Hospital Laboratory Blood Bank will conduct a blood donor drive and open day at the Public Service Union Building from 9:00am to 2:00pm.The Laboratory Blood Bank Princess Margaret Hospital, says a huge thank you to all the wonderful blood donors around Dominica – “you are our heroes.”World Blood Donor Day was established in 2005. It is jointly coordinated by the World Health Organisation (WHO), the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) and the International Federation of Blood Donor Organisations (IFODS).last_img read more

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Lynn Johnson receives a plaque of honor

first_imgMay 28, 2018 Photo by Toni GibbonsLynn Johnson receives a plaque in honor of his retirement as the Arizona Department of Transportation District Engineer for the Northeast District. Pictured are (left to right) Board of Supervisors Chairman Steve Williams, Supervisor Jason Whiting, Johnson, Vice Chairwoman Dawnafe Whitesinger, and supervisors Lee Jack, Sr., and Jesse Thompson. Lynn Johnson receives a plaque of honorcenter_img RelatedSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

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Jason Whiting seeks biomass mandate

first_img By Toni Gibbons         At the Navajo County Board of Supervisors meeting on April 23, Vice Chairman Jason Whiting appealed to the board to approve a letter encouraging the Arizona Corporate Commission to mandate thatSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad April 30, 2019 Jason Whiting seeks biomass mandatecenter_img Photo courtesy of Navajo CountyNavajo County Vice Chairman Jason Whiting.last_img

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Donald Trump Nancy Pelosi trade insults as their feud heats up

first_img Advertising P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies Trump ‘walked the talk’ in pressuring Pak to end terrorism: Indian envoy to US ‘They gave you Nobel for what?’ clueless Trump asks Yazidi activist Nadia Murad More Explained Related News Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 However intended, the exchanges left uncertain ahead of the 2020 election whether Trump and the Democrats will be able to work together on serious, must-pass tasks, such as funding the government and raising the federal borrowing limit, let alone thornier issues such as immigration, national security and more.Pelosi went first, with demure shrugs and practiced sass. Then, as a tornado warning blared across Washington, Trump followed with a derisive nickname — something he had declined to give her, up to now.“She’s a mess,” Trump told reporters at an afternoon news conference in which he lined up White House staff to testify to his calmness the day before when he walked out after three minutes at a meeting with Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Charles Schumer. “Crazy Nancy. … I watched Nancy and she was all crazy yesterday.” As for himself, he declared, “I’m an extremely stable genius.” Pelosi scolded back: Advertising “For some reason, maybe it was lack of confidence on his part … he took a pass, and it just makes me wonder why he did that,” she told reporters back on Capitol Hill. “In any event I pray for the president of the United States.” Trump tweeted back: “Nancy, thank you so much for your prayers, I know you truly mean it!” By AP |Washington | Published: May 24, 2019 2:51:38 pm “I wish that his family or his administration or his staff would have an intervention for the good of the country,” Pelosi said at her weekly news conference, adding that she prays for him and the nation.“Maybe he wants to take a leave of absence,” she said. Asked whether she’s concerned about Trump’s well-being, she replied, “I am.” Trump denied he wanted the House to formally charge him.“I don’t think anybody wants to be impeached,” he said.Pelosi, the second in line to the presidency, said she thinks Trump’s actions Wednesday were part of his skill at distraction. But she also suggested what he does isn’t all strategic. “Sometimes when we’re talking to him he agrees,” she said, only to change his mind. “He says he’s in charge and he may be.” During questions, Pelosi said she thought a reporter had asked about “statutory” intervention, the 25th Amendment.“That’s a good idea,” she said with a smile. “I am going to take it up with my caucus. Not that they haven’t been thinking about it.” She has been insulting Trump since the meeting Wednesday that was supposed to be about bridges and other crumbling infrastructure. Hanging over the increasingly personal exchanges is a drumbeat among about two dozen Democrats and one Republican to launch impeachment hearings against Trump based on special counsel Robert Mueller’s report, which described Trump’s efforts to block his federal investigation.Pelosi has resisted that impeachment pressure, preferring a methodical process by which Congress investigates and lays out the facts on the question of obstruction of justice. She says the House is “not on a path to impeachment,” but she’s been clear this week that an impeachment inquiry is not off the table.Short of that, she’s been happy to give Trump a hard time all year, including questioning his manhood and forcing him to re-open the government without the border wall money he demanded. On Thursday, she said the White House is “crying out” for impeachment — the idea being that a vindication by the Republican-controlled Senate would help assure his re-election.On Thursday, subtlety went by the wayside. Pelosi said Trump has established a pattern of unpredictability, and at one point she even joked about the 25th Amendment, the Constitution’s provision laying out the procedure for replacing a president. Chandrayaan-2 gets new launch date days after being called off “When the ‘extremely stable genius’ starts acting more presidential, I’ll be happy to work with him on infrastructure, trade and other issues,” she tweeted.There was more, before and after that exchange, for political enthusiasts with the time and interest to follow along.For those who don’t: The theater came a day after Trump stalked out of the Cabinet Room demanding an end to all congressional investigations before he would work with Congress on repairing U.S. infrastructure or other matters. He apparently was wound up generally over the ongoing congressional Trump-Russia probes into whether he obstructed justice, and specifically by Pelosi’s jab a few minutes earlier at the Capitol that he “is engaged in a cover-up.”“I don’t do cover-ups,” fumed Trump, who is fighting subpoenas for testimony by current and former White House officials. Best Of Express Trump secures billion dollar deal to eradicate AIDS from US in a decade Advertising Donald trump, us-Iran ties, us-iran nuclear deal, us news, world news, President Donald Trump and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi of Calif., attend the 38th Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service at the U.S. Capitol, Wednesday, May 15, 2019, in Washington. Pelosi said Wednesday that the U.S. must avoid war with Iran and she warned the White House has “no business” moving toward a Middle East confrontation without approval from Congress. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)She’s calling for an “intervention” to save the nation from him. He says she’s “crazy.” The enmity between President Donald Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi deteriorated Thursday into rude-and-then-some questioning of his fitness for office and her sanity, with personal attacks flowing from both the nation’s top elected officials after a dramatic blow-up at the White House. Taking stock of monsoon rain Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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Netanyahu joins forces with Bolton chiding Iran

first_img Related News After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan How Iran could disrupt Gulf oil flows Best Of Express Advertising Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield By New York Times |Jerusalem | Published: June 24, 2019 9:00:55 am President Donald Trump’s national security adviser, John Bolton, warned Tehran on Sunday not to “mistake U.S. prudence and discretion for weakness,” saying that military action against Iran remained very much an option even though the United States last week called off one military strike.Tensions between the two countries had brought Trump to the brink of ordering a retaliatory strike over explosions on oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman and the Iranian downing of a U.S. surveillance drone.The United States said there was no doubt that Iran was responsible for the attacks on the vessels near the Strait of Hormuz, but Iran has denied it. Tehran has also said that the drone breached its air space, though U.S. officials said the drone had been over international waters. john bolton, donald trump, iran, benjamin netanyahu, tehran, middle-east, yemen, syria, iraq, world news, indian express Bolton was in Israel for a trilateral meeting on Tuesday with his Russian and Israeli counterparts. (AP)Written by David M. Halbfinger Taking stock of monsoon rain “No one has granted them a hunting license in the Middle East,” Bolton said Sunday at an appearance in Jerusalem alongside Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel.He echoed Trump’s warnings that the U.S. military was “rebuilt, new and ready to go,” and said that “biting” new sanctions would be imposed Monday, as Trump said.Last week, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran said that the country would within 10 days have produced more low-enriched uranium — the sort used to fuel power plants — than allowed by the 2015 containment deal. The agency suggested that it might soon begin enriching the uranium to higher levels of purity, bringing it closer to what would be necessary to build a nuclear weapon.“Iran can never have nuclear weapons,” Bolton said Sunday. “Not against the U.S.A., and not against the world.” Mike Pompeo discusses Iran with Gulf allies amid escalating crisis Bolton was in Israel for a trilateral meeting on Tuesday with his Russian and Israeli counterparts. “It speaks loudly about the nature of Israel’s standing among the nations, and in this case, among two of the greatest nations on earth,” the Israeli leader said.In his remarks, Netanyahu, who had crusaded against the 2015 Iran nuclear deal that Trump abandoned, ridiculed supporters of the pact, who he said had insisted that it would lead Iran to turn inward and focus on improving its economy.“The very opposite has happened,” Netanyahu said. “Iran used those hundreds of billions of dollars to fund empire-building, not nation-building. That is, the stamping of one state after the other, and the devouring of one state after another in the Middle East.”He cited Iran’s actions in Syria, Yemen and Iraq, and against Saudi Arabia and Israel. Neither he nor Bolton mentioned the “Peace to Prosperity” plan introduced by the White House on Saturday aimed at improving the lot of the Palestinians and their Arab neighbors, in the first public unveiling of the Trump administration’s long-delayed proposal to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.Palestinian leaders have rejected it and are boycotting a conference this week in Bahrain where the Trump administration hopes to persuade Arab and Israeli business executives to embrace its call for some $50 billion in investment in the region. Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Advertising Resignation of Iran’s FM Javad Zarif is setback for reforms in the Islamic republic More Explained 1 Comment(s)last_img read more

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Modi meets BJPs women MPs over breakfast

first_img Advertising Related News Home Minister Amit Shah, who is also the BJP president, and Parliamentary Affairs Minister Pralhad Joshi are the only Union ministers who are part of these meetings.During the 16th Lok Sabha, the prime minister met MPs from various states in every session of Parliament, where he spoke to them about the government’s agenda.The newly elected 17th Lok Sabha has 78 women MPs, the highest since independence. Of these, 41 of them are from the BJP. Advertising Kulbhushan Jadhav ICJ Verdict: Govt, Oppn hail ruling; PM Modi says truth prevailed PM Narendra Modi pulls up ministers for being absent in House narendra modi, BJP women MPs, BJP OBC MPs, BJP SC MPs, BJP ST MPs, breakfast meeting narendra modi breakfast, amit shah, Pralhad Joshi, india news, indian express During the 16th Lok Sabha, Prime Minister Narendra Modi met MPs from various states in every session of Parliament.Prime Minister Narendra Modi met women MPs of the BJP over breakfast at his residence on Friday, the fifth in the series of meetings with a cross-section of parliamentarians from the party. By PTI |New Delhi | Published: July 12, 2019 1:31:27 pm ‘Kulbhushan Jadhav will get justice’: PM Modi after ICJ verdict The party’s MPs have been divided into seven groups and Modi has already met party parliamentarians belonging to the OBC, SC and ST categories, and those who were ministers once, sources said.The meetings have been planned so BJP MPs from both the houses get an opportunity to directly interact with the prime minister, who can guide them and discuss various issues, especially related to Parliament, a BJP leader said.An MP who attended one of these meetings said it was in the nature of informal interaction with Modi directly talking to them. 1 Comment(s)last_img read more

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UN officials express awe over Indias progress in achieving SDGs

first_img india, indian economy, sustainable development goals, sdgs india, sustainable development india, narendra modi, modi government, renewable energy, niti aayog, rajiv kumar, united nations, aadhaar, india news, Indian Express news Addressing the High Level Political Forum 2019 special event ‘From Commitment to Achievement: India’s Experience in Localising the SDGs’ at the UN Headquarters, NITI Aayog Vice Chairman Rajiv Kumar said India at the moment is at the “cusp of a major transformation” and the government has ensured that inclusion will be a part of it. (Source: File)India has said it is committed to accelerating economic growth beyond seven per cent over the next five years while ensuring there is no trade-off between sustainability and development, as top UN officials expressed “awe” over the country’s remarkable progress in moving towards achieving Sustainable Development Goals. Related News Advertising Explained: Kulbhushan Jadhav case file Kartarpur corridor: Pakistan agrees to build bridge, allow visa-free travel to Indian pilgrims ‘Truth, justice have prevailed’: PM Modi on Kulbhushan Jadhav verdict Advertising Salve hails verdict, says ICJ protected Jadhav from being executed Advertising “I am simply in awe of where India today is setting simply new records in how to translate something that we aspire to achieve in development and in many countries still struggle,” he said.Noting that India is not without its own share of struggles, Steiner said in some key areas of development, it has had “really breakthrough impacts… exceeding anything that any country has ever done before” such as the Aadhaar biometric programme.He added that a key part of the ‘leaving no one behind’ narrative of the SDGs is one that can be tested through such a programme.Steiner added that the Aadhaar programme has delivered so much more than anyone else could have thought possible that “I sometimes still wonder why the world has not sat up and studied this more because it is… transformative in the true sense of the word.” 1 Comment(s) India, Pakistan move closer on Kartarpur corridor, pro-Khalistan leader dropped from panel She said that the country is also the epicenter for achieving the SDGs globally and one can see already that “India is not shying away from that responsibility and is bearing that responsibility with great sense of seriousness and understanding of the implications for the world and achievement of SDGs.” Jharkhand court drops ‘donate Quran’ condition for bail to Ranchi woman over offensive post Enormous potential for growth in ties with India: US Addressing the High Level Political Forum 2019 special event ‘From Commitment to Achievement: India’s Experience in Localising the SDGs’ at the UN Headquarters, NITI Aayog Vice Chairman Rajiv Kumar said India at the moment is at the “cusp of a major transformation” and the government has ensured that inclusion will be a part of it.“In the next five years, we are now committed to accelerate growth in India beyond the 7 per cent that we have achieved. We know that to meet our young people’s aspirations, we have to grow at higher rates, keeping in mind clearly the constraints that we have,” Kumar said.“Then the fruits of this growth will reach to the people that we are supposed to reach, who are looking for better education, better health, better delivery of electricity, renewable power,” he said Tuesday. Best Of Express By PTI |United Nations | Updated: July 17, 2019 5:48:49 pm “Now we are going to try and accelerate our growth in the next two decades” so that India emerges as a country by 2030, which has achieved a large part, if not all, of the SDGs and some before the target date, he said.He underscored that in the last five years, the Narendra Modi government has “refused to believe that sustainability and development are a trade-off.”Acknowledging that there are still “huge and immense challenges” for the diverse and 1.3 billion strong country, Kumar said the government is taking up any challenge knowing that “this is the hand that has been dealt to us and we have to make sure that we reduce the carbon imprint, improve our waterways and yet have the development of the last decile of the population – summed up in Antyodaya.”Speaking at the event, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator Achim Steiner lauded India’s ambitious initiatives that are playing a critical role in improving the lives of its people and advancing the SDGs. Kumar emphasised that over the last five years, the government has been ensuring that people at the “bottom of the pyramid” get the benefits that are due to them.“Not just rhetoric and leakages” but the benefits flow to them through the trinity of government initiatives – Jan Dhan bank account, Aadhaar unique identity number and mobile phone. He also highlighted that aiming to ensure financial inclusion, 310 million accounts have been opened in the last five years, 120 million gas stoves provided and a sanitation drive has built millions of toilets across the country.Steiner stressed that part of the efforts to localise the SDGs in India is the ability to have “boutique solutions” that are “designed with people that we are actually trying to work with at the centre of rather than a statistical average.“Therein lies one of the success stories of India’s remarkable poverty eradication story,” he said referring to the 2019 global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) from UNDP which said that India lifted 271 million people out of poverty between 2006 and 2016.“Unbeknownst to the world really, India in the years between 2006 and 2016, did something remarkable. It lifted 271 million people out of poverty. That number alone is mind-boggling and it speaks to the success of …targeted interventions at a level and scale of ambition that is without parallel in any other country in the world,” Steiner said adding that the government’s health coverage scheme is also helping people escape from poverty and earn a livelihood.Resident Coordinator of the UN in India Renata Dessallien said the embrace of the SDGs and Agenda 2030 within the policy framework of the Indian government has been complete.She asserted that India is an “epicenter” of innovative solutions towards the SDGs, both frugal innovations and the most advanced technological and digital-based solutions. More Explainedlast_img read more

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Watch humpback whales trick thousands of fish into becoming dinner

first_imgThe scientists first observed this behavior in a humpback whale in 2011. Since then, they have observed more than 20 individuals doing it. The rapid spread of the technique, often among whales that spend a lot of time together, may indicate that the giant mammals are learning it from each other—possibly as a form of culture, the researchers say. And this, in turn, may help the whales learn new feeding strategies to adapt to future shifts in climate or food availability. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img By Joshua Rapp LearnNov. 26, 2018 , 8:00 AM The humpback whale has one of the biggest mouths on the planet—and the appetite to match. The bus-size mammals can eat up to 2500 kilograms of fish a day, and a new study reveals one way they snag these huge numbers: They make the fish come to them.Humpbacks were already known to have a few hunting tricks up their sleeve. They blow bubbles in giant circles around herring to herd them into tightly grouped schools that can be swallowed whole. They also “power thrust” into dense balls of young herring, catching the fish by surprise.Now, biologists from the Marine Education and Research Society in Port McNeill, Canada, have added a new skill to this repertoire. When seabirds like auklets or murres dive into the water to catch herring, whales off the northeast coast of Vancouver Island in Canada open their mouths half out of the water to make small ponds. Many of the fish mistake the artificial pools as refuges, and once enough have gathered in the whales’ mouths, the whales clamp their jaws shut on an easy snack. Sometimes they even usher a few stragglers in with their pectoral fins, the researchers report in Marine Mammal Science. Watch humpback whales trick thousands of fish into becoming dinnerlast_img read more

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Going to court is like going to a graveyard A day in

first_img Centre orders probe into Jet Airways over alleged mismanagement of funds NCLT, courtroom, NCLT courtroom, National Company Law Tribunal, Mumbai nclt courtroom, mumbai news, indian express Besides bankruptcy cases, NCLT also hears matters such as allegations of mismanagement against companies. (Express Photo: Prashant Nadkar)It’s a humid day at the end of June, and the discomfort is showing among the 60 people crammed into a room designed to hold no more than 25. In an earlier avatar, this room might have been a conference room. Today, it is functioning as a courtroom of the National Company Law Tribunal (NCLT), Mumbai. Advertising Written by Khushboo Narayan | Mumbai | Updated: July 14, 2019 2:35:04 am Essar Steel resolution: Ruias move NCLAT With 32 new judicial members joining after a government notification in May, more than doubling the NCLT’s strength, perhaps they may have time now to fulfill that wish. More Explained In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief In another case, involving the division of a family business, an aunt is told to invite a warring nephew and make lunch for him as the means to reach a settlement. The suggestion does not go down well with either party.Unlike other courts, the NCLT regularly hears litigants who come without lawyers, like a 69-year old today who has approached the tribunal against a firm to whom she had let out her property and which has gone bankrupt. She says the company owes herRs 1 crore in rent and interest and was refusing to vacate. At the hearing, a company official offers to pay Rs 10 lakh within a week but the judicial members ask the firm to revise it or be ready for an adverse judgment.A soft-spoken young lawyer, struggling to make herself heard over the din, is offered help in filing an affidavit. “When did you pass your law? After Class 10th?” a judicial member remarks. “You look like a 15-year-old.” Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook Best Of Express Explained: Kulbhushan Jadhav case file Despite the crowd interest, the case being heard isn’t anything sensational, but a mundane corporate matter where a director of a firm and his promoter are fighting over a Rs 2.5 crore compensation. But since the passage of the bankruptcy law in 2016, the NCLT office, at Mahatma Gandhi Road at Fort, is as central to the Mumbai corporate world as the iconic BSE building or Bombay House, the headquarters of the Tata group.Under the law, the NCLT is the adjudicating authority for bankruptcy and corporate cases, and a massive influx of cases means it is now as busy as the rest of India’s overburdened judicial system. It is also as short of infrastructure and staff strength. Apart from bankruptcy cases, the NCLT also hears matters such as allegations of oppression and mismanagement against companies.Since January 2017, the tribunal has admitted 1,858 cases under the bankruptcy law. Till March 2019, only 715 had seen some kind of closure. Of the rest that are pending, 362 cases have been pending beyond 270 days, the time limit set by the bankruptcy law for closure. The burden of numbers is evident at the NCLT, with its walls plastered with notices like “Kindly give seats to Advocates and lawyers/professionals during proceedings… Others may occupy seats if they are empty”.The contesting parties include lenders and borrowers, buyers and suppliers, as well as employers and employees. Just like lawyers seeking customers outside regular courts, the NCLT has ‘resolution professionals’ chasing clients handing out business cards.On this June day, the cause list has 52 cases, and all of them are called out. It is no surprise that the “judicial members (equivalent to judges)” begin the proceedings asking litigants, “Any chance of a settlement?”Seeking to push the parties towards settlements rather than lengthy trials, the judicial members use humour to prodding and reprimand. Hearing the case of the director versus the company promoter, the judicial member tells the latter’s son, “I know that in courts joh jeeta wahi Sikandar, but babu, tell your father to be considerate. Going to court is like going to a graveyard.” Advertising NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Advertising Related News Sebi bars Hotel Leelaventure from selling properties to Brookfield Asset Management Not everyone is treated as gently. Snapping at a lawyer for frequent interruption, a judicial member says, “I think your fees is fixed on the basis of the number of words you speak.” The room bursts out laughing.An hour-long lunch break follows, and one of the first cases to be taken up after it is a bankruptcy case that has resulted in a potential environment hazard. Thirteen vessels of a shipping firm that owes Rs 1,500 crore to its lenders have been floating unmanned at one of the country’s busiest ports in Mumbai, with at least two oil ships lying tangled at the Bombay Port Trust (BPT). The BPT and Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust have approached the NCLT to seek removal of the ships, fearing chances of an oil spill off the Mumbai coast.During the course of the hearing, a bemused judicial member tells the BPT, “Can we visit these ships? We have never been on one.” Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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